Acharya receives NSF CAREER Award

Jayadev Acharya, Assistant Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University, recently received a U.S. National Science Foundation Early Career Development (NSF CAREER) Award from the Division of Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF). The award supports his research proposal on “Statistical Inference Under Information Constraints: Efficient Algorithms and Fundamental Limits” for a five-year period from 2019 through 2024 with a total amount of $552,654.

“Consider an app on a mobile device,” says Acharya. “We would like it to be small in size (takes little storage), communicate as little as possible (small data usage), leak as little information about the user (preserves individual privacy), consume little power (preserves battery life), and so on.” However, these wishes are often at odds with each other, and despite data sciences many successes, these trade-offs are poorly understood even in the simplest settings.

Acharya aims to establish the fundamental trade-offs between these resources, and to design efficient schemes that achieve them. “A fundamental understanding of the limits and trade-offs between constrained resources such as samples, time, memory, communication and privacy is critical for tackling the many challenges in data science that lay ahead,” says Acharya. He plans to integrate ideas from computer science, information theory, machine learning and statistics. Acharya will also develop outreach activities that target undergraduate students and under-represented communities.

According to the NSF, “The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of early-career faculty who have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education and to lead advances in the mission of their department or organization. Activities pursued by early-career faculty should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research.”

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