Aaron Wagner promoted to Full Professor

ECE’s Aaron Wagner has been promoted to the rank of Full Professor following approval from the Cornell Engineering Board of Trustees, effective July 1, 2018.

ECE’s Aaron Wagner has been promoted to the rank of Full Professor following approval from the Cornell Engineering Board of Trustees, effective July 1, 2018. 

Wagner joined the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University as an assistant professor in 2006. Wagner’s primary research interest lies in information theory, especially compression, feedback communication, security, and quantum information. 

Wagner’s research and teaching have been recognized with several awards including the IEEE Information Theory Society’s James L. Massey Research & Teaching Award for Young Scholars(2017), the Douglas Whitney '61 Excellence in Teaching Award from Cornell Engineering (2015), the Cornell Michael Tien ’72 College of Engineering Teaching Award (2009), the NSF CAREER award (2007), the David J. Sakrison Memorial Prize from the U.C. Berkeley EECS Dept. (2006), and the Bernard Friedman Memorial Prize in Applied Mathematics from the U.C. Berkeley Dept. of Mathematics (2005). Two of his students won the 2010 Information Theory Society Student Paper Award.

Wagner received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of California, Berkeley. During the 2005-2006 academic year, he was a postdoctoral research associate in the Coordinated Science Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a visiting assistant professor at Cornell ECE. He received his B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Read more about Wagner’s work at: http://people.ece.cornell.edu/wagner/index.htm

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