"Bruce Land receives Ruth and Joel Spira Outstanding Teaching Award"

Bruce has been teaching in the School in various capacities for the last 20 years. For the last 8 years he has taught our capstone course ECE 476 Digital Systems Design using MicroControllers.

Bruce has been teaching in the School in various capacities for the last 20 years. For the last 8 years he has taught our capstone course ECE 476 Digital Systems Design using MicroControllers. This has become the most popular course in the school, due primarily to Bruce's enthusiasm, teaching skills, and personal guidance in the lab.

In ECE 476, Bruce teaches the students about designing systems using microcontrollers, and then allows each student to build and test a self-generated design projects. Bruce has helped students build robots, health monitors, computer games, energy controllers, and "smart trains". It’s an amazing array of projects that he leads each year. His web page, http://people.ece.cornell.edu/land/courses/ece4760/FinalProjects/shows most of the projects from over the years.

Each year Bruce encourages all students to submit their designs for publication. Many students have seen their projects published in national magazines.

This award is not the first time Bruce has been recognized for his outstanding teaching. In 1993 he was awarded the “Faculty of the Year” teaching award in Computer Science. In 1996 he won first place in "Instructional Materials" at the national ACM SIG User Conference XXIV. In 1995 he presented a series of lectures on "Innovation in Undergraduate Teaching" at Oregon State University. Bruce is a leader in instruction.

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