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Resources and Groups for ECE Women

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Events

Past events include:

  • May 6, 2018: PhEM meeting, 2:00pm, Upson 202
  • March 2, 2018: Johnson Women in Technology Conference
  • December 7, 2017: Women in STEM lunch, 12:15pm-1:15pm, 401 Physical Sciences [For Faculty only]
  • December 2, 2017: Have pizza with fellow women in ECE/MAE/AEP, 1pm, Upson Lounge
  • November 21, 2017: WISE Luncheon for faculty women, 11:30-1pm, Upson 102
  • September 20, 2017: Coffee hour with fellow women in ECE/MAE/AEP, 4.30-6pm, Upson Lounge

 

Other Groups for Women at Cornell Engineering

Scholarships and Travel Funds for ECE Women

The ECE Women's Conference Travel Grants, Women's Professional Development Grants and Women's Technical Exposure Grants are funded by a gift from the IBM Corporation, with the goals of assisting in the retention of the current ECE female student population, increasing the presence of female scientists in high-rank ECE related positions both in academia and in industry, as well as in the recruiting of female students pursuing both graduate and undergraduate ECE degrees.

Please download (here) application forms for these 3 grants.

 

Group discussion topic examples

  • How do I get 5 (!) recommendation letters?
  • What is the best way to land a good postdoc/industry job?
  • How do I solve my two-body issue?
  • How do I choose a good project to work on in my postdoc/faculty position in my Ph.D.?
  • If I TA during my grad studies will it help me get a faculty job?
  • How do I balance my career and family?
  • How do I get a summer internship?
  • How do I know what's an interesting job?
  • When I negotiate a faculty position or an industry job what kind of a startup/salary should I aim for?
  • How do I deal with (subtle) sexual harassment? When is it appropriate to speak up?

 

Implicit Bias

Implicit bias comes from years of societal input, and is not something that can be easily changed. Instead, we can acknowledge that it exists and handle it accordingly. Prof. Petersen recommends trying out the implicit bias test from Harvard. It is free and you don’t have to give any personal information.