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Spotlight

Ope Oladipo '17: Bridging fields to create something new

Ope Oladipo’s (ECE B.S. ’17) interest in electronics started at a young age, but it wasn’t until he moved to New York City from Nigeria as a sophomore in high school that he really started working with Arduinos, microcontrollers, and other devices, which cemented his interest in electrical and computer engineering. More

Mikayla Diesch ’16, M.Eng ’17: Solving problems to make life better

As a high school sophomore, Mikayla Diesch and her younger sister competed in a competition to create an energy bar for NASA—and won. More

Hazal Yüksel: Pushing boundaries through curiosity

Hazal Yüksel is working to create a chip that aggregates multiple functionalities onto a single chip, making it smaller and cheaper, and potentially creating a paradigm shift in wireless communications. More

Welcome Kirstin Petersen

When Kirstin Petersen was a high school student, she had the opportunity to spend some time at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena. More

Welcome Christina Delimitrou

Christina Delimitrou, assistant professor in Cornell’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), did not have a computer until she was 17. More

Christoph Studer: Doing things differently to improve wireless communications

The most exciting and interesting research problems come from working in multiple disciplines. More

Rick Johnson: Breaking rules to create a new field of study

Rick Johnson’s field of expertise did not exist until he helped created it. More

Joe Skovira: Embedding systems to make things work better

Integration is growing so much and processors are getting more complicated—students need to work with them to see what they can do. More

Shiva Rajagopal: Breaking rules to make life better

I want to be where I can have a direct effect on the world and make things that help the people around me. More

José Martínez: Breaking the rules to reimagine computer architecture

It’s critical to realize that disruption and incremental improvement are both absolutely necessary for progress, and that as a researcher one should be willing to embrace both. More