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Other Awards and Honors

Cornell ECE Professor Batten named to Intel Early Career Faculty Honor Program

ChrisBattenProfessor Christopher Batten has been named as a recipient of the 2013 Intel Early Career Faculty Honor Program (ECFHP) Award. The ECFHP was created to help Intel connect with the best and brightest early-career faculty members at the top universities around the world.

Through this program, Intel provides financial and networking support to those faculty members who are early in their careers and who show great promise as future academic leaders in disruptive computing technologies. The purpose of this Program is to help promote the careers of these promising faculty members and to foster long-term collaborative relationships with senior technical leaders at Intel. 

Awardees are chosen through an annual competitive nomination and selection process at select schools in the US, EU, China, and Taiwan. Awardees are given a significant cash award to fund their travel to Intel for networking purposes and to help advance their research agenda.

Christopher Batten is an Assistant Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University, where he leads a research group focusing on energy-efficient parallel computer architecture for both high-performance and embedded applications. His work has been recognized with several awards including an NSF CAREER award (2012), a DARPA Young Faculty Award (2012), and an IEEE Micro Top Picks selection (2004). Prior to his appointment at Cornell, Batten received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2010.

More information about Professor Christopher Batten can be found at http://www.ece.cornell.edu/ece/people/profile.cfm?netid=cb535 and http://www.csl.cornell.edu/~cbatten/.

Official annoucements from Intel:


Michal Lipson elected to IEEE fellow (12/3/2012)

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Michal Lipson was elected Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) for 2013 for "for contributions to design and applications of nanoscale photonic devices".

The grade of Fellow recognizes unusual distinction in the profession and is conferred by the Board of Directors upon a person with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. The accomplishments honored shall have contributed importantly to the advancement or application of engineering, science and technology, bringing the realization of significant value to society.
The IEEE Fellows are an elite group from around the globe. The IEEE looks to the Fellows for guidance and leadership as the world of electrical and electronic technology continues to evolve.

2013 Newly Elevated Fellows


Eilyan Bitar Named Croll Fellow (11/30/2012)

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The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering is pleased to announce that Assistant Professor Eilyan Bitar has been named a Croll Faculty Fellow.  This announcement comes from the Engineering Dean’s office in late November. 

Eilyan joined the faculty as an Assistant Professor in July 2012.  Prior to joining Cornell, he was a postdoctoral fellow (2011-2012) at both the California Institute of Technology in the department of Computing and Mathematical Sciences and the University of California, Berkeley in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. A native Californian, he received both his Ph.D. (2011) and B.S. (2006) from the University of California, Berkeley in Mechanical Engineering. 

The donor, David Croll, received his BS degree from Engineering in 1970.  David’s primary philanthropic interests at Cornell have been Sustainable Energy Systems and the Faculty Renewal Initiative.  Croll is a member of the Board of Trustees since 2005, David currently serves as vice chair of the Board of Trustees and as chair of the Trustee Finance Committee.  He is also a member of the Executive, Board Composition and Governance, Development, and Academic Affairs Committees, as well as the Major Gifts Committee.  He is a dedicated and active volunteer, and has taken a lead role in engaging other alumni in the Boston area.  David (also Harvard MBA ’73) is a founder and managing partner of M/C Venture Partners, a venture capital firm located in Boston that focuses primarily in the services sectors of communications, technology, and media, cultivating lucrative investment opportunities in areas such as wireless services, fiber communications services, out-of-home advertising and technology-services.

Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellowship (11/1/2012)

Sheila-HemamiProfessor Sheila Hemami has been named a Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellow, Cornell President David J. Skorton has announced.  Hemami is a professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and is also Associate Director of the School.

Weiss fellowships recognize tenured faculty who have "sustained records of effective, inspiring, and distinguished teaching of undergraduate students and of contributions to undergraduate education."  Hemami was praised by her students for her "contagious excitement about the subject" and her "focus on problem-solving skills with real-world applications."  Similarly, Hemami's colleagues cited her leadership in curriculum revisions, dissemination of best practices in teaching, and programs for women students and faculty.

Hemami will be formally honored for this fellowship in May, 2013, during Commencement Weekend.

Hemami is the fourth ECE faculty member to be named a Weiss Fellow, following C. Richard Johnson, Clifford Pollock, and Michael Kelley, making ECE the Cornell department with the largest number of Weiss Fellows.

Michael Tien ’72 Excellence in Teaching Award (10/29/2012)

The College of Engineering has selected Salman Avestimehr and Bruce Land as recipients of the Michael Tien '72 Excellence in Teaching Award. This is the highest award for teaching in the college. Avestimehr and Land were nominated by colleagues from our School and then selected by a committee, comprised of former teaching prize winners from within the College of Engineering. Congratulations to Salman and Bruce!

Kenneth A. Goldman ’71 Excellence in Teaching Award (10/29/2012)

Rajit-ManoharThe College of Engineering has selected Rajit Manohar as recipient of the Kenneth A. Goldman '71 Excellence in Teaching Award. This is the highest award for teaching in the college.  Manohar was nominated by colleagues from our School and then selected by a committee, comprised of former teaching prize winners from within the College of Engineering. Congratulations to Rajit! 








Stephen Wicker Receives Douglas Whitney ’61 Excellence in Teaching Award (9/29/2012)

The College of Engineering has selected Stephen Wicker as recipient of the Douglas Whitney ’61 Excellence in Teaching Award. This is the highest award for teaching in the college. Wicker was nominated by colleagues from our School and then selected by a committee, comprised of former teaching prize winners from within the College of Engineering. Congratulations to Stephen!

Zygmunt Haas Receives 2012 IEEE Communications Society WTC Recognition Award

Professor Zygmunt J. Haas has been awarded the 2012 IEEE Communications Society WTC Recognition Award, "in recognition of his outstanding achievements and contributions in the area of wireless communications systems and networks". The award will be presented to Prof. Haas at the IEEE Globecom 2012 conference, in Anaheim, CA, Dec 3-7, 2012.

DARPA Young Faculty Award (07/25/2012)

ChrisBatten

The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering is pleased to announce that Professor Christopher Batten received a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Young Faculty Award for his research project entitled "Complexity-Effective Vector Specialization for Image and Video Processing". 

This project is exploring a new approach to designing hardware accelerators called complexity-effective vector specialization (CEVS) that is based on a novel combination of the single-instruction multiple-threads (SIMT) architectural design pattern often used in graphics-processing units and scalar instruction specialization. CEVS should approach the efficiency of custom image/video accelerators, yet preserve much of the flexibility of general-purpose multicores while reducing overall software and hardware complexity. The project is using a vertically integrated research methodology that spans application kernel development, instruction set design, microarchitecture design, and VLSI implementation. The three goals for this project are: (1) to conduct a simulation-based design-space study of CEVS; (2) to build a small proof-of-concept CEVS ASIC prototype; and (3) to quantitatively measure the benefit of CEVS using the ASIC prototype. 

The purpose of the DARPA Young Faculty Award program is to identify and engage rising research stars in junior faculty positions at U.S. academic institutions and expose them to Department of Defense (DoD) needs as well as DARPA's program development process. In addition, the program provides funding, mentoring, and industry and DoD contacts to awardees early in their careers so they may develop their research ideas in the context of DoD needs. 

Batten is an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, a graduate field member of computer science, and a member of the Computer Systems Laboratory at Cornell University. He leads a research group focusing on energy-efficient parallel computer architecture for both high-performance and embedded applications. His work has been recognized with several awards including an NSF CAREER award (2012) and an IEEE Micro Top Picks selection (2004). Prior to his appointment at Cornell, Batten received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2010. He received an M.Phil. in engineering as a Churchill Scholar at the University of Cambridge in 2000, and received a B.S. in electrical engineering as a Jefferson Scholar at the University of Virginia in 1999.

Ao Tang Receives Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) (7/25/2012)

The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering learned on July 23, 2012 that Professor A. Kevin Tang received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

The Presidential early career awards embody the high priority the Obama Administration places on producing outstanding scientists and engineers to advance the National goals, tackle grand challenges, and contribute to the American economy. Sixteen Federal departments and agencies join together annually to nominate the most meritorious scientists and engineers whose early accomplishments show the greatest promise for assuring America's preeminence in science and engineering and contributing to the awarding agencies' missions.  

Professor Tang joined ECE at Cornell in Fall of 2007 as an assistant professor. Tang received his B.E. from Tsinghua University, Beijing in 1999 and an M.E. from Tsinghua University, Beijing in 2001. In 2002 he received his M.S. from California Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in 2006 also from California Institute of Technology. Tang is broadly interested in control and optimization of engineering networks such as the Internet and power grids. Special attention is given to obtaining compact global understanding, providing predictions that can be quantitatively compared with experimental data, and designing scalable distributed algorithms.

Ao Tang Receives US Air Force Young Investigator Research Award (1/20/2012)

Cornell ECE assistant professor A. Kevin Tang is one of 48 scientists and engineers across the United States to receive a prestigious Young Investigator Research Award from the US Air Force’s Office of Scientific Research. 

According to a Jan 11, 2012 press release from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research: 
“The Air Force Office of Scientific Research announced it will award approximately $18 million in grants to 48 scientists and engineers who submitted winning research proposals through the Air Force's Young Investigator Research Program. The YIP is open to scientists and engineers at research institutions across the United States who received Ph.D. or equivalent degrees in the last five years and show exceptional ability and promise for conducting basic research. The objective of this program is to foster creative basic research in science and engineering, enhance early career development of outstanding young investigators, and increase opportunities for the young investigators to recognize the Air Force mission and the related challenges in science and engineering.” 

Source - http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-01/afoo-aag011112.php 

Assistant professor Tang’s research interests include: Communication Networks, Interconnected Dynamical Systems, Stochastic Networks and Processes, and Optimization Theory, Control Theory and Applications.

Assistant professor Gregory Fuchs from the College of Engineering's Applied and Engineering Physics department was also among this year's winners of the Air Force Young Investigator Research Program. 

Related Article: "Two win Air Force young investigator awards" 
By Susan Lang, Cornell Chronicle

Cornell’s iGem Team led by ECE’s Xiling Shen wins a top prize at 2011 iGEM WORLD Championship Jamboree hosted by MIT (11/15/2011)

The International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition is a worldwide Synthetic Biology competition aimed at undergraduate university students. Students form teams in the spring to design new genetic devices that work in living cells. After winning the United States Regional qualifier, the Cornell iGEM team went on to win a gold medal and the top prize in the best manufacturing category at the IGEM 2011 Word Championship (Jamboree). Faculty advisors Xiling Shen and Matthew Delisa led Cornell's team, which has been competing for the last three years. 

Dr. Shen points out a few unique aspects of the Cornell team, including: 

  • As a young team, Cornell did exceptionally well against more established teams from other top institutes. 
  • "They came up with the idea entirely on their own, attesting to their ingenuity" 
  • The team was able to implement and test a fully-functional system "rather than staying on the conceptual level"
  • The Cornell team was one of the most interdisciplinary teams in the competition - comprised of "students from pretty much all engineering departments as well as biology departments".

Shen summarizes, "We want to raise the awareness for the iGem team because this is the most interdisciplinary undergrad team on campus." Shen points out that this team brings together the College of Engineering, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. While the team is supported by all three colleges the engineering college has taken the lead. "[The mission of the iGem team] represents the new initiative from college of engineering to grow in the bio and energy areas. This is a showcase that undergraduate students can break the traditional departmental boundary and work on a self-defined projects for innovation." 

2011 iGEM Team Abstract: 
Cornell's 2011 iGEM team has designed a new method to produce complex biomolecules. BioFactory utilizes a modular microfluidic chip and bacteria that are programmed to release functional enzymes when excited by light. When combined in series, these chips operate as an automated bio-manufacturing assembly line. This innovative method will help produce complex molecules and lower manufacturing costs for pharmaceuticals and biofuels in the future. [source: http://2011.igem.org/Team:Cornell


Fellow to the Optical Society of America (11/8/2011)

Clifford Pollock, Ilda and Charles Lee Professor of Engineering in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) has been recognized for "significant and seminal contributions to the development of novel tunable and ultrafast laser sources and for continuous dedication as an educator to outstanding teaching" by the Optical Society of America, the world's premiere scientific society for lasers and optics. He will be honored at the annual Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics next spring. 

Pollock's research has focused on developing tunable IR lasers for optical communication, remote sensing, and spectroscopy. He is currently exploring new lasers based on ZnSe hosts, and on improving the size, weight, and power efficiency of existing IR solid state lasers for remote applications using novel diode pumping schemes.

Amir Avestimehr Receives Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) (9/20/2011)

On September 26, 2011, President Obama named 94 researchers as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. Professor A. Salman Avestimehr was one of the recepients for "pushing the frontiers of information theory through its extension to complex wirelss information networks". 

The Presidential early career awards embody the high priority the Obama Administration places on producing outstanding scientists and engineers to advance the Nation’s goals, tackle grand challenges, and contribute to the American economy. Sixteen Federal departments and agencies join together annually to nominate the most meritorious scientists and engineers whose early accomplishments show the greatest promise for assuring America’s preeminence in science and engineering and contributing to the awarding agencies' missions. 

Dr. John P. Holdren (right), Cornell ECE Professor A. Salman Avestimehr (center), S Dr. Joan Ferrini-Mundy (left)

Photo with Dr. John P. Holdren (right), the President’s science and technology advisor and director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Dr. Joan Ferrini-Mundy (left), assistant director for Education and Human Resources at the National Science Foundation. Photo Credit NASA/Paul E. Alers.

“It is inspiring to see the innovative work being done by these scientists and engineers as they ramp up their careers—careers that I know will be not only personally rewarding but also invaluable to the Nation,” President Obama said. “That so many of them are also devoting time to mentoring and other forms of community service speaks volumes about their potential for leadership, not only as scientists but as model citizens.” 

The awards, established by President Clinton in 1996, are coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President. Awardees are selected for their pursuit of innovative research at the frontiers of science and technology and their commitment to community service as demonstrated through scientific leadership, public education, or community outreach.

Cornell ECE Professor Pierre-Alexandre Gourdain receives $420K NSF award to investigate the effect of magnetic field on high energy density plasma dynamics, with potential applications to fusion energy and astrophysics

Cornell ECE Professor Pierre-Alexandre Gourdain received a $420K award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study how magnetic fields are mixing in high energy density plasmas. This research aims at answering an open question, which is of great interest to the international scientific community, in particular thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. With this award, Professor Gourdain will compare experimental results to numerical computations, aiming at validating advanced plasma models. The project will also study the interaction of the magnetic field with supersonic plasma flows, which are ubiquitous astrophysical occurrences encountered in supernovae and accretion disks surrounding black holes. 

Prof. Gourdain has been working in the field of theoretical plasma physics since he completing his B.S. in 1996. He earned his Ph.D. in 2001 in theoretical plasma physics from Ecole Centrale de Lyon and UCLA where he worked on the Electric Tokamak until 2008. He then joined the faculty of Cornell's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. As a member of Cornell's Laboratory of Plasmas Studies, Pierre’s research focuses on the study of high energy density plasmas. This new and emerging branch of plasma physics may very well change the world by producing a clean stable source of energy known as fusion power!

NSF Awards $330K to Professor Amit Lal (8/10/2011)

Professor Amit Lal receives a $330k award from the National Science Foundation for the project entitled "Self-Powered Ultra High Vacuum Technology for Harsh Environment Wireless Sensors." This program will develop technology that helps in realizing highly reliable sensors, based on radioisotope thin films, that provides far greater social benefit than the risk posed by the use of radioisotopes. Specifically the program will develop self-powered vacuum pump technology using miniscule amounts of radioisotopes, required for reliable use of self-reciprocating cantilevers. 

Lal joined the faculty at Cornell University in 2002. His is a member of the Cornell Nanobiotechnology Center, Cornell Center for Materials Research, and the Atkinson Center for Sustainable Future. He is a field member of the Cornell Biomedical Engineering and School of Applied and Engineering Physics. 
Professor Lal is also a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the Acoustical Society of America (ASA).

Cornell Site Director of the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (8/9/2011)

Professor Tong has been appointed as the Cornell site director of the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC).  As a National Science Foundation Industry-University Cooperative Research Center,  PSERC draws on university capabilities to creatively address the challenges facing the electric power industry.

Professor Tong is the Irwin and Joan Jacobs Professor of Engineering.

His recent research focuses on future power and energy systems and smart grid including home energy systems, wind integration, state estimation, and grid security.  He is also part of the Engineering and Economics of Electricity Research Group (E3RG) at Cornell.

Martínez, 2011 Tau Beta Pi Professor of the Year in the College of Engineering (4/12/2011)

José Martínez has been elected the Tau Beta Pi Professor of the Year by the engineering students. In a letter from Dean Collins, Prof. Martínez was congratulated for his "talent as one of our [College of Engineering] most outstanding teachers." Prof. Martínez received the award at a luncheon hosted by The Cornell Engineering Alumni Association (CEAA).  

The Tau Beta Pi engineering Honor Society recognizes a tenure track professor as one of the college’s most outstanding teachers. Professors are nominated by their students and selected by Tau Beta Pi. Tau Beta Pi is the only engineering honor society representing the entire engineering profession. It is the nation’s second-oldest honor society, founded at Lehigh University in 1885 to recognize students of distinguished scholarship and exemplary character. 

Prof. Martínez's earlier teaching awards include a 2005 Kenneth A. Goldman '71 Excellence in Teaching Award, as well as a 2007 Merrill Presidential Teacher recognition. On the research side, his work has earned awards that include two IEEE Micro Top Picks papers; a HPCA Best Paper Award; a NSF CAREER Award; and two IBM Faculty Awards. 

Prof. Martínez graduated in 1996 from the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, and earned MS (1999) and Ph.D. (2002) degrees in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

“Cornell Engineering Alumni Association’s (CEAA) Academic Achievement award” (3/24/2011)

Cornell ECE Senior Lecturer Bruce Land has been chosen as a recipient of the Cornell Engineering Alumni Association's (CEAA) Academic Achievement Award for his "extraordinary service and dedication to the students in the College of Engineering".  

Bruce R. Land is currently a Senior Lecturer in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, where he does undergraduate and graduate teaching in the areas of microcontrollers and bioinstrumentation, and advising of Masters of Engineering students. Bruce has contributed significantly to the undergraduate education of ECE students through (1) encouraging and coaching his students to publish their work; (2) undergraduate project advising; (3) team project advising; and (4) freshman advising. 

Bruce will receive the award at a luncheon on April 14th. 

The Cornell Engineering Alumni Association established the Academic Achievement Award to recognize non-tenure staff/lecturers who go well beyond their job duties for advising, teaching and general help to students and who enhance undergraduate education outside of the classroom.Department Chairs nominate individuals for this award and the final selection is made by the office of the Associate Dean for Engineering Undergraduate Programs. 

"Toby Berger Receives IEEE Richard W. Hamming Medal” (3/4/2011)

ECE Professor Emeritus Toby Berger receives the IEEE Richard W. Hamming Medal for his contributions to Information Theory, including source coding and its applications.

Professor Lester Eastman, ECE, is now Given Foundation Professor of Engineering Emeritus (01/26/2011)

Lester EastmanProfessor Lester Eastman, ECE, is now Given Foundation Professor of Engineering Emeritus, having been awarded the emeritus title by the provost effective January 1. Eastman, who joined the Cornell faculty in 1957, is a fellow of IEEE, the American Physical Society and the Alexander van Humboldt Society, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He also holds three degrees from Cornell: Bachelor of Science, 1953; Master of Science, 1955; and Ph.D., 1957.




 

IEEE Fellows (12/09/2010)

The IEEE Board of Directors has elevated Professors David Albonesi and Stephen Wicker to IEEE Fellows. David Albonesi was recognized for his contributions to power-efficient and adaptive computer architecture and Stephen Wicker for his contributions to wireless information systems.

David-AlbonesiProfessor Albonesi works in the area of computer architecture, with an emphasis on adaptive and reconfigurable multi-core and processor architectures, power- and reliability-aware computing, and high performance interconnect architectures using silicon nanophotonics.

 

 

 

 

Stephen-WickerProfessor Wicker works in the area of information networks, with an emphasis on the application of game theory, mechanism design, and technologies that enhance privacy and expression rights for those using large-scale information systems. The IEEE Grade of Fellow is conferred by the IEEE Board of Directors upon a person with an outstanding record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. The total number selected in any one year cannot exceed one-tenth of one- percent of the total voting membership. IEEE Fellow is the highest grade of membership and is recognized by the technical community as a prestigious honor and an important career achievement. The IEEE is the world's leading professional association for advancing technology for humanity. Dedicated to the advancement of technology, the IEEE publishes 30 percent of the world's literature in the electrical and electronics engineering and computer science fields, and has developed more than 900 active industry standards.


Young Investigator Award by Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) (11/19/2010)

KevinTangKevin Tang was awarded an Young Invesigator Award by Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to support his research project entitled, "Constructive Sparse Signal Recovery with Verifiable Guarantee".

Facing the challenges of timely identifying, locating and eliminating malfunctioning (or comprised) components in a complex system under incomplete information, this project proposes a constructive and algorithmic approach for threat or anomaly detection by exploiting various sparsity structures therein. A special feature of this project that differentiates it from many existing related work is the focus of looking for explicit algorithmic solutions to the inference problems with finite dimensions. 

To learn more about Professor Tang's research, please visit: http://networks.ece.cornell.edu. In addition, you can visit: http://www.dtra.mil to learn more about the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

“Michal Lipson Receives Blavatnik Awards for Young Scietists” (11/16/2010)

The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering is pleased to announce that Associate Professor Michal Lipson has received the 2010 New York Academy of Sciences Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists. 

The award was awarded to a total of four faculty and three postdoctorl scholars from various universities. The winners were among more than 150 nominations by a jury of 58 leading scientists after two rounds of reviews. To learn more about the Blavatnik Awards, please visit: http://www.nyas.org/awards/blavatnik.aspx 

The finalists work in a wide variety of scientific disciplines. Those in faculty positions conduct research in the fields of astrophysics, biochemistry, earth sciences, engineering, and neurosciences. Postdoctoral fellow finalists are pursuing work in the areas of behavioral sciences, cell biology, computer sciences, nanotechnology, and structural biology. 

Winners and finalists were honored at the New York Academy of Sciences’ 7th annual Science & the City Gala, on November 15, 2010.

US Air Force: Young Investigator Program Award (10/28/2010)

A_Salman_AvestimehrSalman Avestimehr is one of 43 scientists and engineers from across the nation to receive the Young Investigator Program Award from Air Force office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

The objective of this program is to foster creative basic research in science and engineering, enhance early career development of outstanding young investigators, and increase opportunities for the young investigators to recognize the Air Force mission and the related challenges in science and engineering. 

According to AFOSR, the competition is intense. AFOSR received 242 proposals in response to its broad agency announcement in major areas of interest to the Air Force including, aerospace, chemical and material sciences; physics and electronics; and mathematics, information and life sciences. Proposals were based on the evaluation criteria listed in AFOSR's broad agency announcement. Those selected will receive the grants over a three to five year period. More information about the award can be found at: http://www.wpafb.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123229259.

Salman's research will focus on the impacts of local network-state information on the design of distributed communication networks for military applications.

United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Selection (09/14/2010)

Stephen-WickerProfessor Steve Wicker has been selected to serve on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board for a three year term (beginning September 2010). The Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) is a Federal Advisory Committee organized under the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The SAB provides a link between the Air Force and the nation's scientific community. The SAB promotes the exchange of the latest scientific and technical information that may enhance the accomplishment of the Air Force mission. In addition, it may consider management challenges that affect Air Force use of scientific knowledge and technological advances. The Board's function is solely advisory, and provides findings and recommendations to the Air Force senior leadership, namely the Secretary of the Air Force or the Chief of Staff of the Air Force.

Professor Wicker received his B.S. from the University of Virginia, his M.S. from Purdue University and his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California.  His major was Electrical Engineering, respectively.

 

DARPA Young Faculty Award (YFA) (07/22/2010)
Alyosha_Molnar

"The DARPA Young Faculty Award (YFA) program will identify and engage rising research stars in junior faculty positions in academia and expose them to Department of Defense (DoD) needs and DARPA's program development process. The YFA program will provide high-impact funding to these rising stars early in their careers in order to develop their research ideas in the context of DoD issues. The long term goal is to develop the next generation of academic scientists, engineers, and mathematicians in key disciplines who will focus a significant portion of their career on DoD and National Security issues."  -- Excerpt from the Defense Science Office's award announcement.

Alyosha Molnar received a BS in engineering with highest honors from Swarthmore College in 1997. While attending UC Berkeley's graduate school in 2001, Alyosha received his MSEE in 2003 for his design of an ultra-low power RF transceiver for "Smart Dust" working with Professor Kris Pister. He then joined Frank Werblin's neurobiology lab where he completed his doctoral work (still in electrical engineering), focusing on dissecting the neuronal circuitry of the rabbit retina using a combination of electrophysiology, pharmacology and anatomy. After receiving his PhD in May 2007, Alyosha joined the ECE department at Cornell as an assistant professor where he will continue is interdisciplinary research in integrated circuits and neurobiology.

“Phase II of SBIR and Congressional Plus Up” (5/3/2010)

Widetronix Corp., co-founded by ECE Professor Mike Spencer, was awarded Phase II of SBIR, as well as a congressional plus up, announced on May 3rd, by Congressman Maurice Hinchey at a press conference at the South Hill Business Park. Widetronix develops radio-isotope based batteries for medical and security applications. 

Mike Spencer is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Cornell University. Research interests include the epitaxial and bulk growth of compound semiconductors such as GaAs, SiC and AlN, microwave devices, solar cells and electronic materials characterization techniques. His particular interest has been in the correlation of device performance with material growth and processing parameters.

"Donald Farley Receives Hannes Alfven Medal of the European Geosciences Union” (1/28/2010)

ECE Professor Donald Farley is awarded the Hannes Alfven Medal of the European Geosciences Union. The Hannes Alfven Medal honors outstanding scientists who have made major contributions toward understanding solar system and other cosmic plasma environments. This medal was established in recognition of the scientific achievements of Hannes Alfvem, who received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1970 for his work on controlled magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics. 

The medal will be presented to Professor Farley during the General Assembly of the Union to be held in May 2010 in Vienna, Austria, where Prof. Farley has been invited to present a "Medal Lecture." 

Dr. Farley joined the ECE's faculty in 1967. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and a member of the American Geophysical Union, the International Scientific Radio Union (URSI), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

“Office of the Secretary of Defense Award for Exceptional Service” (1/28/2010)

ECE Professor Amit Lal received the Office of the Secretary of DefenseAward for Exceptional Service thru his service as Program Manager, Microsystems Technology Office) (DARPA). From October 2005 through SeptDefense Advanced ResearchProjects Agencyember 2009, Dr. Lal led DARPA's pioneering work in Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) into a wide variety of applications. His leadership in MEMS harnessed the power of miniaturization and atomic physics to construct microscale sensors and gyroscopes that will enable precision navigation for individual soldiers and unmanned air and underwater vehicles in GPS-limited environments. He started several new areas of research including, metamorphosis based bio-electrical interfaces to insects for a new class of hybrid devices, and ultralow power nano-electromechanical switches. These accomplishments of Dr. Lal bring recognition to his research, DARPA, and Cornell ECE. 

Dr. Lal joined the faculty at Cornell University during July of 2002. Prof. Lal is a member of the Cornell Nanobiotechnology Center and the Cornell Biomedical Engineering Department. He is also a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science  (AAAS), (IEEE), athe Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and the Acoustical Society of America (ASA).

"Sheila Hemami Elected IEEE Signal Processing Society Distinguished Lecturer” (11/11/2009)

Professor Sheila Hemami has been elected an IEEE Signal Processing Society Distinguished Lecturer, with a two-year term starting 2010.

Prof. Hemami's work reflects the integration of the goal of providing "anytime, anywhere visual communications" with characterizing the human visual system (HVS). To understand HVS characteristics, she explores how the human brain perceives visual information by developing better models for visual cortex processing, as well as models which include understanding and cognition. She simultaneously develops both theory and practice for signal processing techniques which can fully exploit HVS characteristics. The resulting models provide improved processing, higher efficiency, and/or better compression performance. This dual approach consisting of signal- processing informed psychophysics and psychophysics-informed signal processing has yielded substantial gains over traditional decoupled approaches. 

The IEEE Signal Processing Society's Distinguished Lecturer Program provides means and financial support for IEEE chapters to have access to individuals who are well known educators and authors in the fields of signal processing. Prof. Hemami's research accomplishments in visual communications have earned her the recognition. During her term as a Distinguished Lecturer, she will give lectures to IEEE local chapters across the world.

“Clifford Pollock Receives Marsha D. McCormick Award for Excellence in Advising” (9/21/2009)

Professor Clifford Pollock receives the Marsha D. McCormick Award for excellence in advising first year students. Advising first year students takes on particular significance since this is the initiation period for young adults into a unique and intense learning community. At Cornell, this means knowing how to make referrals for academic issues, career and guidance counseling, and mental health assessment. Professor Pollock was able to customize each relationship, blend skills of interest, and guide and mentor each of his advisees. Professor Pollock received nominations from first year students, faculty and administration.

“2009 IBM Faculty Awards” (8/10/2009)

José Martínez and Kevin Tang have each received a 2009 IBM Faculty Award. The IBM Faculty Award program is a worldwide competition intended to "(1) foster collaboration between researchers at leading universities worldwide and those in IBM research, development and services organizations; and (2) promote courseware and curriculum innovation to stimulate growth in disciplines and geographies that are strategic to IBM." 

José Martínez is associate professor at the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, which he joined in 2002. 

Kevin Tang joined the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell in 2007, where he is now an assistant professor. During the 2006-07 academic year, he was a junior fellow with the social and information sciences laboratory at the California Institute of Technology.

“Paul Kintner Selected Jefferson Science Fellow with the US Department of State” (6/18/2009)

Paul Kintner has been selected to become a Jefferson Science Fellow with the US Department of State in Washington, DC. Paul will take a sabbatical leave from Cornell during the academic year 2009-2010.

Each Fellow spends one year at the U.S. Department of State or the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) for an on-site assignment in Washington, D.C. that may also involve extended stays at U.S. foreign embassies and/or missions. All JSF assignments will be designed in consultation with regional and/or functional bureaus within the U.S. Department of State/USAID. While in general JSF assignments will involve providing up-to-date expertise in the rapidly advancing STE arenas that routinely impact the policy decisions encountered by the U.S. Department of State/USAID, each Fellow will also be expected to become conversant with the functional operation of the U.S. Department of State/USAID. Following the fellowship year, the Jefferson Science Fellow will return to his/her academic career, but will remain available to the U.S. Department of State/USAID for short-term projects over the following five years. 

Criteria for selection: 

  • Ability to articulate science and technology issues to the non-specialist/general public. 
  • Ability to rapidly and accurately understand scientific advancements outside their discipline area and to effectively integrate this knowledge into U.S. Department of State policy discussions. 
  • Open-mindedness and receptive attitudes toward public policy discussions at the U.S. Department of State/USAID. 
  • Stature, recognition and experience in the national and international scientific or engineering community. 

He was appointed to the faculty in 1981. Kintner is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

“AFOSR MURI Award” (6/15/2009)

The award (1 million per year for 5 years) will be shared approximately equally between Cornell and Columbia (Columbia is the lead). The principal investigator is Rick Osgood at Columbia and Professor Michael Spencer will lead the Cornell efforts. Other members on the Cornell team include: ECE faculty Sandip Tiwari, Edwin Kan, Farhan Rana as well as Paul McEuen in Physics. 

The award centers on the exploitation of the material graphene for new device applications. Graphene or single monlayer, single crystal graphite has seen an explosion of interest worldwide. Columbia building on DARPA funding and Cornell building on NSF CCMR funding have large numbers of faculty interested in the properties and applications of these materials. In addition to the recent MURI funding, and the ongoing CCMR funding Cornell and Columbia are in the finals of a NSF STC competition centered on graphene research. 

According to the Department of Defense (DoD), “The awards are the result of the fiscal 2009 competition that … AFOSR conducted under the DoD Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) program. The MURI program supports research by teams of investigators that intersect more than one traditional science and engineering discipline in order to accelerate both research progress and transition of research results to application. Most MURI efforts involve researchers from multiple academic institutions and academic departments. Based on the proposals selected in the fiscal 2009 competition, a total of 69 academic institutions are expected to participate in 41 research efforts.” 

Professor Spencer received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1981 and then joined the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

“David Delchamps Receives 2009 Kendall S. Carpenter Memorial Advising Award” (5/8/2009)

Delchamps was one of four [Carpenter Memorial Advising] awardees honored on May 23rd at a Trustee-Faculty dinner “which recognizes the winners of university-wide teaching and advising awards along with newly tenured faculty”. A committee of previous winners provided nominees for the award to President Skorton who in turn made the final selection based on Professor Delchamp’s “wonderful testimonials from students and colleagues about [his] advising”. 

Cornell Trustee Stephen Ashley established the Carpenter Awards in honor of Kendall S. Carpenter, a professor of business management at Cornell from 1954 -1967. The Kendall S. Carpenter Memorial Advising Award recognizes an individual’s “sustained and distinguished contributions of professorial faculty and senior lecturers to undergraduate advising.” 

Professor Delchamps has been on the faculty of the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering since 1982. His research focuses on applying techniques from dynamical systems theory, game theory, and stochastic processes to the modeling, analysis, and design of natural and artificial complex multi-agent systems. Such systems arise in variety of application areas ranging from biology to telecommunication networking to economics.

“Professor Haas receives an invitation to join the IEEE ComSoc Distinguish Lecturers Tour (DLT) ” (5/20/2009)

Prof. Zygmunt J. Haas was invited to deliver a series of lectures in the Scandinavian countries as part of the IEEE ComSoc Distinguish Lecturers Tour (DLT) program. In this tour, Dr. Haas will present the work conducted in his Wireless Networks Lab at 7 academic and industrial institutions in Sweden, Finland, and Denmark. The tour is planned to take place in a 2-week period, starting end of May and ending beginning of June.

"Michal Lipson Receives Provost Award for Distinguished Scholarship” (4/23/2009)

Cornell recognizes Michal Lipson who recently received the Provost Award for Distinguished Scholarship for research in the field of silicon photonics. 

In a letter from Provost Kent Fuchs, The Provost Award for Distinguished Scholarship is "given to recognize distinguished research by outstanding tenured faculty early in their careers. It is an opportunity for the university to recognize its talented researchers". In Professor Lipson’s case, "the award was granted for her research in the field of silicon photonics which develops technology for manipulating light signals on a microelectronics chip for future low power consumption".

Michal joined the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University in 2001 as an Assistant Professor. Her research at Cornell involves novel on-chip Nanophotonic devices. She was the recipient of the NSF CAREER award in 2004, is the inventor of 8 patents on novel micron-size photonic structures for light manipulation and is the author of over 40 papers in the major research journals in physics and optics. She is currently a topical editor of Optics Letters.

“The American Physical Society (APS) Council elects David Hammer to the Executive Board" (8/23/2008)

The American Physical Society (APS) Council has elected Prof. David Hammer to the APS Executive Board for a two-year term. The Council is the body that makes decisions for the Society membership that are not within the powers granted to the President of the APS or the Executive Officer, and the Executive Board is responsible for planning many of the actions taken by the Council. Prof. Hammer is currently serving a four-year term as the Plasma Physics Division's "Councillor."

Prof. Hammer is the J. Carlton Ward Professor of Nuclear Energy Engineering and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He has been on the Cornell faculty since 1977.

"Lang Tong Named 2009 IEEE Signal Processing Society Distinguished Lecturer” (11/21/2008)

Professor Lang Tong named as an 2009 IEEE Signal Processing Society Distinguished Lecturer. Professor Tong conducts research in the general areas of statistical signal processing, wireless communications, network and information theory. His lecture topics include distributed sensing and inference, roles of signal processing in secure and anonymous networking, and opportunistic spectrum access for cognitive radios. The IEEE Signal Processing Society's Distinguished Lecturer Program provides means and financial support for IEEE chapters to have access to individuals who are well known educators and authors in the fields of signal processing.

"Sheila Hamami Elected IEEE Fellow” (11/18/2008)

The IEEE Board of Directors, at its meeting on 12 November 2008, has elevated Sheila Hemami to IEEE Fellow, effective 1 January 2009, with the following citation: for contributions to robust and perceptual image and video communications. 

The primary objective of her research is to enable high-quality, reliable visual communications for all users. All users, regardless of their individual network connection bandwidths, qualities-of-service, or terminal capabilities, should have the ability to access still images, video clips, and multimedia information services, and to use interactive visual communications services. Specific research topics include motion estimation and compensation for video coding, psychovisually-based image processing and compression, and error-resilient coding for transmission applications. 

Sheila is currently the Editor-in-Chief for the IEEE Transactions on Multimedia. She chaired the IEEE Image and Multidimensional Signal Processing Technical Committee, and has served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing. In 1997 she received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award. She held the Kodak Term Professorship of Electrical Engineering at Cornell University from 1996-1999. In 2000 she received the National Eta Kappa Nu C. Holmes MacDonald Outstanding Teaching Award, and she has won numerous teaching awards at Cornell. In 2005 she received the Alice H. Cook and Constance E. Cook Award at Cornell University for her leadership of the Women in Science and Engineering committee.

"Gookwon Edward Suh Receives Young Investigator Program (YIP) Award” (11/10/2008)

ECE's Edward Suh is one of the 39 scientists and engineers from across the nation to receive the Young Investigator Program Award from Air Force office of Scientific Research AFOSR. 

The objective of Young Investigator Program is to foster creative basic research in science and engineering, enhance early career development of outstanding young investigators, and increase opportunities for the young investigators to recognize the Air Force mission and the related challenges in science and engineering. 

According to AFOSR officials, competition for the YIP award is intense. This year AFOSR received 210 proposals in response to the AFOSR broad agency announcement solicitation in major areas of interest to the Air Force. The areas of interest include: aerospace, chemical and material sciences; physics and electronics; and mathematics, information and life sciences. AFOSR officials select proposals based on the evaluation criteria listed in the broad agency announcement. 

Edward will study heterogeneous multicore platform through diversity and redundancy for enhancing the security of future systems.

"Paul Kintner Wins International Ionospheric Effects Symposium First Prize” (5/27/2008)

Paul Kintner wins first prize for a paper, entitled Simulating Inosphere-Induced Scintillation for Testing GPS Receiver Phase Tracking Loops, which was submitted at the 125th International Ionospheric Effects Symposium (IES) in Washington, DC on May 13-15th. Approximately 125 papers were submitted. 

“DARPA 2008 Young Faculty Awards” (3/25/2008)

Three ECE assistant professors, Ehsan Afshari, Sunil Bhave, and Farhan Rana, have been identified by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to receive DARPA 2008 Young Faculty Awards. DARPA made awards to 39 "rising stars in university microsystems research" who are on the faculty of 27 universities located in 17 different states. The DARPA Young Faculty Award program is designed to seek out ideas from non-tenured faculty in order to identify the next generation of researchers working in microsystems technology.

“2008 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Electrical Engineering” (3/5/2008)

The 2008 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Electrical Engineering will be presented to Emeritus professor James Thorp for his career work at Cornell in the "development and application of microprocessor controllers in electric power systems. These devices make synchronized measurements to monitor and protect components throughout the power grid, playing a key role in diminishing the frequency and impact of blackouts." He is sharing the award with Prof. Arun Phadke of Virginia Tech. The award will be presented on April 17 in Philadelphia. 

Related articles: 

"Two Virginia Tech electrical engineers named among the greatest in science, engineering, and technology in the world" -Virginia Tech News 

The 2008 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Electrical Engineering (Announcement) - Franklin Institute Website

"Michal Lipson Elected Fellow of Optical Society of America” (9/24/2007)

Michal Lipson was elected Fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA) by the Board of Directors at their September 2007 meeting. Prof. Lipson is recognized for outstanding contributions to the field of silicon nanophotonics, including the development of high-bandwidth modulators and low-power nonlinear optical devices. OSA members who have served with distinction in the advancement of optics may be proposed for election to the class of Fellow. This honor is reserved to no more than 10% of the total membership.

"John Belina Receives Kendall S. Carpenter Memorial Advising Award” (8/25/2007)

Cornell Engineering Magazine
Summer 2007
Pg 32 

"... John Belina has recently been awarded the university’s Kendall S. Carpenter Memorial Advising Award. The $5,000 award recognizes “sustained and distinguished contributions of professorial faculty and senior lecturers to undergraduate advising.” Previously, he was named the 2006–2009 Rosenblatt Endowed Faculty Fellow for his sustained contributions to students outside the classroom and to the life of the residential communities. 'Advising is one of the most important things at Cornell because [the university] is very decentralized,' says Belina..."

"Zygmunt Haas Elected Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers” (8/12/2007)

Professor Zygmunt J. Haas was elected Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in 2007 for "contributions to wireless and mobile ad-hoc networks".

The grade of Fellow recognizes unusual distinction in the profession and is conferred by the Board of Directors upon a person with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. The accomplishments honored shall have contributed importantly to the advancement or application of engineering, science and technology, bringing the realization of significant value to society. 

The IEEE Fellows are an elite group from around the globe. The IEEE looks to the Fellows for guidance and leadership as the world of electrical and electronic technology continues to evolve.

“ECE Professor Goes to Washington...” (4/6/2007)

In an effort to explain an alarming event which resulted in the disruption of global positioning signals (GPS) “around the world”, professor Paul Kintner joined other researchers at a conference in Washington DC. Although Kintner and his grad-student Alessandro Cerruti predicted an event like this is likely to occur, the effect, said professor Kintner, was “more profound and widespread than we thought possible”.

- April 8, 2007, Washington Post [read more]

“Professor Johnson is the Featured Guest on NPR's Science Friday Show – May 18, 2007” (5/18/2007)

“… can number crunching determine whether art is authentic? We'll talk with a scientist (Professor Richard Johnson) who says that a technique called 'stylometry' may be able to distill the essence of an artist's technique down to a set of geometric data points. He met this week with representatives of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. Can the technique determine whether a purported 'van Gogh' was really painted by the master? We'll run the numbers….”

-- NPR’s Science Friday. An archive of the show will be stored on Science Friday's website after it airs on the radio. 

National Public Radio's Talk of the Nation: Science Friday® is a science talk show that can be heard each Friday afternoon, 2-4 p.m. on .  selected NPR stations

Van Gogh's sunflower painting

Science of art: Scientists say ‘stylometric’ analysis could tell if a version of a Van Gogh sunflower painting bought by a Japanese insurance company (left) is a forgery. At right is an authentic painting from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. -- AP 

 

 

 

Related article: 

Is that painting real? Ask a mathematician. Engineers use a mathematical process dubbed 'stylometry' to set apart real Van Gogh paintings from forgeries. -- By Elizabeth Svoboda | Contributor to The Christian Science Monitor 

"On May 14, teams of engineers that Mr. Johnson recruited will meet with art students and curators at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam to announce what they think sets real Van Gogh paintings apart from forgeries. By analyzing a database of 101 paintings by the artist and his known imitators, the scientists have arrived at what they say are key elements of Van Gogh's 'visual signature,' which can be distilled into numbers. This, they say, will give art experts an important new tool to assess works like 'Vase With Fifteen Sunflowers.' They can compare how closely a disputed painting's visual signature matches the baseline "signature" derived from the database."[read more]

"Rajit Manohar Receives Global Indus Technovators Award” (12/1/2006)

The Indian Business Club at MIT has awarded 10 young (under-40) innovators and entrepreneurs of South Asian origin Global Indus Technovators Awards. The ten were recognized for their outstanding contributions to biotechnology, information technology and grassroots technology, among others. Rajit Manohar received an award in the information technology area for his work on asynchronous FPGAs.

“IEEE Micro Top Picks” (11/15/2006)

“Leveraging Optical Technology in Future Bus-based Chip Multiprocessors”, by José Martínez, Alyssa Apsel, David Albonesi, and Ph.D. students Nevin Kırman, Meyrem Kırman, Rajeev Dokania, and Matthew Watkins, is among this year's IEEE Micro Top Picks from Computer Architecture Conferences.

"Jose Martinez Receives IBM Faculty Award” (6/30/2006)

Assistant Professor José Martínez received a 2006 IBM Faculty Award in recognition of the quality of his research program and its importance to industry.

"Michal Lipson Receives IBM Faculty Award” (6/30/2006)

Assistant Professor Michal Lipson received a 2006 IBM Faculty Award in recognition of the quality of her research program and its importance to industry.

"Sandip Tiwari Receives IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award” (1/1/2007)

Professor Sandip Tiwari (ECE) was named the 2007 recipient of the IEEE Cledo Brunetti Award with the accompanying citation: "For pioneering contributions to nano-crystal memories and to quantum effect devices". The Brunetti Award recognizes outstanding contributions to the advancement of information storage with emphasis on technical contributions in computer data storage device technology. 

Visit the IEEE website for more information about the Cledo Brunetti Award, award recipients, and Sandip Tiwari.

"Toby Berger Receives 2006 IEEE Leon K. Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award” (10/1/2006)

Professor Toby Berger, Electrical and Computer Engineering, has been selected as the recipient of the 2006 IEEE Leon K. Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award "for sustained excellence in graduate education and research information theory." This award honors teachers of electrical and electronics engineering and the related disciplines, 'for inspirational teaching of graduate students in the IEEE fields of interest.' Recipient selection is administered by the IEEE Awards Board through the Technical Field Awards Council, and is based on the following criteria: excellence in teaching graduate students, curriculum development with the inclusion of current research and development knowledge that reflects the state of the art in courses, authorship of course material for graduate students; and involvement with and direction of students to prepare them for effective careers in engineering and the sciences, and the quality of the nomination. The award is made to one individual only, and consists of a bronze medal, certificate and honorarium. Professor Berger is the second faculty member of ECE to receive this prestigious award; the first recipient was Professor Lester F. Eastman, who received the award in 1999.

“Best Paper Award” (2/1/2005)

José Martínez and Ph.D. students Nevin Kırman, Meyrem Krman, and Mainak Chaudhuri, have received the Best Paper Award at the Intl. Symp. on High Performance Computer Architecture (HPCA), for their paper "Checkpointed Early Load Retirement."

“Lang Tong Elected Fellow of the IEEE” (1/31/2005)

Lang Tong was elected to Fellow of the IEEE "for contributions to statistical signal processing for communications and wireless networks." The election to Fellow is awarded to less than 1/20th of a percent of the IEEE membership each year, and represents one of the highest honors that IEEE can bestow.

“Lang Tong and M. Dong Receive Best Paper Award” (1/31/2005)

Lang Tong and one of his former students, M. Dong, were selected to receive the 2004 IEEE Signal Processing Society Best Paper Award for their paper, "Optimal Design and Placement of Pilot Symbols for Channel Estimation."

“IEEE Micro, "Top Picks" (2/16/2004)

"Speculative Synchronization: Programmability and Performance for Parallel Codes," written by Jose Martinez, with his then Univiversity of Illinois advisor Jose Torrelas, was named in the November/December 2003 issue of IEEE Micro as a "Top Pick." Top Picks were papers from conferences over the past year that were judged to have had a major impact on the field. 

Quoted from IEEE Micro: "Jose F. Martinez, in recognition of the inclusion of 'Speculative Synchronization: Programmability and Performance for Parallel Codes' in the 2003 Micro Top Picks special issue on the most industry relevant and significant papers of the year in computer architecture. Congratulations on your contributions to our field. P.B., Editor-in-Chief, IEEE Micro."

"James Thorp Awarded Best Paper" (2/6/2004)

James Thorp, his student Jie Chen, and Tim Mount from AEM won the award for best paper in The Complex Systems Track at HICSS in January. (Hawaii International Conference in System Science). This was the not a best student paper award, it was the best paper award.

"David Hammer Receives 2004 Plasma Science and Applications Award” (2/5/2004)

Dave is being recognized by the Society "for fundamental contributions to the understanding of intense relativistic electron beam propagation, intense ion beam generation and propagation, innovative plasma diagnostic development for intense beam devices, x-ray source development using novel plasma pinches, and for his commitment to the mentoring of graduate students in the field of plasma science." This prestigious award is presented annually to an individual who has demonstrated "outstanding contributions to the field of plasma science." It is awarded by the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society. In recognition of this award, Professor Hammer will present a plenary address at the 2004 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science in Baltimore June 2004.

“2004 Lockheed Martin University Research Grants Project" (2/5/2004)

Alyssa Aspel's project is "Resonant Monolithic Photodetectors and On-Chip Waveguides for Integrated Optoelectronics."

"Paul Kintner Elected American Physical Society Fellow” (12/18/2003)

Prof. Paul Kintner, ECE, has been elected a fellow of the American Physical Society. He was recognized for his "investigation of microstructure, wave-particle interactions, and plasma acceleration in space plasmas using sounding rocket and satellite experiments and for innovative applications of GPS technology to space plasmas experiments."

“IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal” (12/18/2003)

ECE Prof. Tom Parks has been named as a co-recipient of the 2004 IEEE Jack Kilby Signal Processing Medal, along with James McClellan, "for fundamental contributions to digital filter design and interpolation, especially for Parks-McClellan algorithm." The IEEE Jack S. Kilby Signal Processing Medal was established by the Board of Directors in 1995 and may be presented "for outstanding achievements in signal processing." The medal is named in honor of Jack S. Kilby. His innovation was a monumental precursor to the development of the signal processor and digital signal processing. The award consists of a gold medal, bronze replica, certificate, and a cash honorarium.

"Zygmunt J. Haas Receives the Highly Commended Paper Award" (12/16/2003)

Zygmunt J. Haas received the "Highly Commended Paper" Award "Performance Evaluation of the Modified IEEE 802.11 MAC for Multi-Channel Multi-Hop Ad Hoc Network", IEEE International Conference on Advanced Information Networking and Applications (AINA 2003), Xidian University, Xian, China, March 27-29, 2003.

"David Hammer Elected Vice-Chair of the Division of Plasma Physics" (12/16/2003)

David Hammer has been elected the Vice-Chair of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society (APS/DPP). He has responsibility for the program of the annual meeting of the APS/DPP in November 2003. From November 2003 - November 2004, he will Chair the Division.

"Lester Eastman Receives Distinguished Educator Award” (12/16/2003)

Lester Eastman received the Distinguished Educator Award, 2003, for IEEE Microwave Theory and Technique Society.

"Michael Kelley Receives Fulbright Grant” (12/16/2003)

Mike Kelley has been awarded a Fulbright grant for Greece during the 2002-2003 academic year. He is one of about 800 U.S. faculty and professionals who will travel abroad to some 140 countries in the next academic year under the Fulbright Scholar Program. Established in 1946, the program's purpose is to build mutual understanding between the people of the U.S. and other countries. Recipients of the Fulbright awards are selected on the basis of academic or professional achievement and because they have demonstrated extraordinary leadership potential in their fields.

"Stephen Wicker Receives NSF Award” (12/16/2003)

National Science Foundation has awarded a $2.5 million Information Technology Research Grant to Cornell University for the development of "Self-Configuring Sensor Networks for Disaster Prevention, Mitigation, and Recovery." The project team, led by Professor Steve Wicker, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, includes molecular biologists, device physicists, telecommunications engineers, information theorists, game theorists, and civil engineers. The focus of the research effort will be the development of self-configuring wireless sensor networks that can quickly and reliably determine the location of survivors and the presence of toxic chemicals, biohazards, extreme heat, and radiation at disaster sites. The goal is to more quickly rescue survivors while protecting the lives of rescue personnel against unseen dangers. The project will be conducted in collaboration with Wadsworth Laboratories at the New York Department of Health.