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ECE Major

ECE Program Education Objectives

The School of Electrical and Computer Engineering strives to prepare graduates whose career and professional accomplishments will include the following:

  1. Proficient application of analytical reasoning using state of the art approaches derived from the engineering sciences and engineering practice;
  2. Skillful, confident, and successful design of systems, components, or processes --- should design be part of their career;
  3. Continual receptiveness to new challenges and continual learning, which support successful adaptation to technological and cultural change;
  4. Engagement in effective teamwork, collaboration, and communication with colleagues;
  5. Exercise of leadership, at levels appropriate to their experience, which addresses issues in a responsive, ethical, and innovative manner.
Overview

This undergraduate handbook has been designed as a reference guide for Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) students at Cornell University. The College of Engineering Undergraduate Handbook is available here.

The curriculum of an electrical engineer has two components:

  • The Common Curriculum
  • The ECE Major Program

In these pages we answer some common questions regarding these requirements. You may want to look particularly at the Graduation Checklist for an overview of all the requirements before you begin reading the other sections of this handbook.

General information such as Academic Standing, Dean's List requirements, Advanced Placement, Transfer Credit, Adding/Dropping courses, and Leaves of Absence can be found in the Courses of Study publication. These are also described online in the Engineering Advising and Student Records Resource Guide.

If you have any questions regarding graduation requirements or the ECE Major Program that are not answered in this handbook, feel free to contact one of our ECE Major Consultants or their assistants:

 


See Also:

Did you know?

Hwa C. Torng’s, ‘60, research was the benchmark for Intel’s Pentium chips which enabled processors to read, evaluate, and execute instructions.